Tesi Disponibili

On this page you can find proposals for thesis aimed at the achievement of Laurea Specialistica or Laurea Magistrale.

In case you are interested you can send me an email (check on the homepage for the address) to set an appointment.

Model Predictive Control for the Management of Distributed Resources

Description A careful estimation of the resources (CPU time, memory, network bandwidth, etc.) required by an application can enable energy savings by adopting, for example, speed scaling, etc. As the software is often hard to be predicted, simple feedback strategies are used to calibrate the amount of allocated resources. Model Predictive Control (MPC) is an optimization-based technique that is capable to achieve high efficiency.

In this work the student will be asked to investigate the application of MPC to the problem of optimally allocating distributed/parallel resources.

Skills: optimization, linear programming, real-time analysis, MATLAB, LaTeX.

Available for the following academic degrees:

Other info:

Vehicular Communication Protocols at Application Level

Description Traffic congestion does represent a major source of pollution for the environment. The acquisition of information, for example about the traffic status, could enable a more efficient usage of the roads network.

At the Scuola Superiore Sant'Anna, it has been developed a co-simulator that integrates a vehicular simulator (Aimsun) with a communication simulator (OMNeT++). The idea is to develop application-level V2I (vehicle to infrastructure) or V2V (vehicle to vehicle) protocols that enables a more efficient usage of the roads, possibly taking advantage of the natural motion of the vehicles.

Skills: C++, communication protocols, LaTeX.

Available for the following academic degrees:

Other info:

Application of Group Theory to Periodic Task Scheduling

Description Real-time applications are often modeled by a set of periodic tasks. Each task has an execution time and a period. The schedulability problem is to guarantee that all tasks have completed before being activated again (after a period). Typical analysis methods, such as the Response-Time Analysis, are based on the evaluation over a time window of the latest completion time.

Existing literature does not explore the natural modular structure of the problem. It is instead possible to view a time instant over the schedule as a point in the commutative group obtained by the Cartesian product of the integers modulo Ti, with Ti equal to the task period. The student will be asked to investigate this alternative modelling, which could potentially lead to a new formulation of the schedulability conditions.

Skills: commutative finite groups, real-time scheduling problems, LaTeX.

Available for the following academic degrees:

Other info:

HW Implementation of Schedulability Tests

Description Real-time applications are often modeled by a set of periodic tasks. Each task has an execution time and a period. Schedulability tests are algorithms that check if all tasks will always complete before being activated again (after a period). These tests are often very time consuming.

The student will be asked to implement in a schedulability algorithm in hardware using a Hardware Description Language such as Verilog or VHDL.

Skills: VHDL, Verilog, modular arithmetic, schedulability analysis, LaTeX.

Available for the following academic degrees:

Other info:

HW Monitor of Tasks Execution

Description To calibrate the amount of CPU time to be allocated to each task/process/thread, it is necessary to implement fine measurements of the CPU run-time. These measurements are often implemented by timers.

The student will be asked to implement a programmable hardware mechanism for finely measuring the CPU time. The implementation will be made on a core that is freely available, using a hardware description language such as VHDL or Verilog.

Skills: VHDL, Verilog, schedulability analysis, CPU architectures, LaTeX.

Available for the following academic degrees:

Other info: